Energy Realpolitik
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Energy Realpolitik

Amy Myers Jaffe delves into the underlying forces shaping global energy.

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A security guard closes a gate at the Sihui Long Distance Bus Station in Beijing after the city has stoped inter-province buses services as the country is hit by an outbreak of the new coronavirus, January 26, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Concerns Over the Coronavirus Spread to the Oil Industry

The first priority in addressing the coronavirus is preserving global health. Lessons from the past show that the herculean task requires timely and credible action by governments, coordinating leadership from the World Health Organization, and constructive cooperation among nations. Read More

February 5, 2020

Election 2020
2020 Presidential Candidates Race to Renewable Energy, But How Will They Get There?

This is a guest post by Zoe Dawson, a recent graduate of The Center for Global Affairs at New York University. She was previously an intern for Energy and Climate Policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

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January 8, 2020

Iran
Iranian Interests, Iraqi Oil, And The U.S. Response

My grandmother had a saying: “Think before you speak.” The saying, said to me and my brothers as children, was intended to help us avoid mindlessly blurting out something we would later regret. I cannot help thinking of my grandmother’s useful adage in watching the news regarding the ongoing conflict between Iran and the United States.

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November 22, 2019

Iran
Reports of Oil’s Demise May Be Premature

I have a rule of thumb on the oil price cycle: When commentators start using the word “never” we are typically at the brink of a cycle shift. For a while now, oil prices have been stuck in a range. That stasis has led to much commentary that prices will never go up again. The evidence that oil prices can never rise again came to traders from a simple concept: The all-time, worst imaginable event that could slay oil supply—a successful military attack on Saudi Arabia’s Abqaiq crude processing facility—came and went with only a brief upward whimper in the price of oil.

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